SEC Media Days 2013

NCAA Football: SEC Media Days

Will Muschamp Looks To Overcome The Adversity Of The Media

Mid-July is probably my least favorite time of year in the world of sports. Don’t get me wrong, I love me some baseball, but honestly all I can seem to think about is football season.

And that is precisely why I am thrilled that it’s time again for SEC Media Days, so we get to talk about the football we’ve been craving. I am even more amped that I get to cover them!

No, I won’t be in Hoover, but I’ll be working with Florida Sports Talk Radio (formally ESPN Radio Ocala) to give you the best of the best of the media circus. I’ll post the links to my stories here, and I’ll fill you in on anything else ridiculous that may happen, like say Les Miles rappels down another 24-story building like he did in May.

I was lucky enough to be able to pick the players/coaches I get to write about, and I think I made some pretty smart decisions. Here’s who I’ll be covering this week, and why I chose them.

Tuesday July 16th:

Hugh Freeze- Head Coach Ole Miss: This guy snatched up some great highly touted recruits this past Signing Day, and he despised the fact that people were wondering how he pulled it off. Can a team that won just three SEC conference games make some noise on the field in 2013–where it really counts? Hugh Freeze sure thinks so.

James Franklin- Quarterback Missouri: James Franklin was arguably one of the most underrated dual threat quarterbacks in 2012, mostly due to his injury plagued season and his offensive line took a beating in their inaugural season in the line-of-scrimmage league SEC. Franklin’s 2013 season could be his best yet.

Wednesday July 17th:

Johnny Manziel- Quarterback Texas A&M: This pick was the easiest to make. Johnny Football is watched like a hawk during his off the field activities, and most recently he got some heat for being asked to leave the 2013 Manning Passing Academy for showing up late and being “sick” which the media has interpreted as being hungover. I wonder how many actual football questions he’ll get Wednesday.

Tony Hurd Jr.- Defensive Back Texas A&M: TAMU’s defense faces a huge test on September 14th, featuring an AJ McCarron who is the best of the best quarterbacks in the entire country, let alone the SEC. Additionally they face LSU in November, whose offense led by QB Zach Mettenberger could be significantly better in 2013.

Thursday July 18th:

Aaron Murray- Quarterback Georgia: Murray has the most tools in the country out of anyone to get a Heisman in 2013. His entire offensive line returns, along with virtually the whole receiving corp minus Tavarres King. Will Murray’s final season be one for the ages?

Be sure to check back here all week for additional SEC Media Days updates. P.S. only 46 days until Gator Football!

Morgan Moriarty is a third year Telecommunications major at the University of Florida. She works in the Office of Student Life on campus, and covers college football and recruiting for Florida Sports Talk Radio. She is also on the University of Florida Women’s Club Water Polo Team. Follow her on Twitter here @Morgan_Moriarty

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One Response to SEC Media Days 2013

  1. Hal Bennett says:

    SEC MEDIA DAYS — A MISNOMER FROM THE GET-GO?
    An award-winning historian came on C-Span some weeks ago, and one of the eye-popping things he had to say about World War II was that General Omar Bradley was overrated. His point was that Bradley outlived all his contemporaries, such as Eisenhower and Patton, and that therefore it was Bradley who was consulted in the making of the movie PATTON, the result being that previous historians had followed Bradley’s appraisal of American generalship during the war. Of course Bradley was going to play up his own role to the derogation of the roles of others, notably Patton’s. If you’ve ever paid attention to the movie, Bradley comes out smelling like a rose — he’s the guy who had to put up with the gangster Patton. What would the movie have been like if Patton had outlived Bradley, and it was Patton who was consulted instead of Bradley?

    Well, the same sort of question might be asked regarding “The Media” and those whom it covers in Sport. I’m not old enough to have been around when Grantland Rice spoke in such flowery terms about Sports heroes that after the 1935 Rose Bowl, won by Alabama over Stanford, he called Dixie Howell “The Human Howitzer from Hartford, Alabama.” But I am old enough to remember that there was not much difference between that and the way Bennie Marshall, sports editor of THE BIRMINGHAM NEWS, wrote about the three national championship teams of Bear Bryant during the 1960′s. One Atlanta writer, a disciple of Furman Bisher, said at the time, “You have to get up pretty early in the morning to stomach that sort of thing.”
    I’m also old enough to think that about 1980 the change came in this country as to the way sportwriters covered Sport. It seems to have come out of the Rock Era, when the policy of letting the singer sing louder than the drummer changed to one of letting the drummer play louder than the singer. Suddenly I began to notice that the Sportswriters began to think that what they wrote was at least as important as what the players and coaches themselves were doing on the field. One sportswriter went so far as to say by about 2000 that without the writers the players and coaches would not and could not be successful.
    Is this week really SEC Media Days? Sure, there is supposed to be 1000 writers there in Hoover. But if it is SEC Media Days, then why don’t I see the names of these Media people on the schedule instead of the names of the fourteen head coaches and three of each one’s players? But then, it is the media folks who are writing this event up, isn’t it, just as it was General Bradley who was consulted when it came time to make the movie PATTON.

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