Conference Realignment, Super Conferences and a Playoff

We at bourbonmeyer.com aren’t the smartest bunch. We’re in no danger of being confused for the crack sports journalists over at Yahoo Sports. Heck, we’re not even at ESPN’s level.

[You see what we did there, we juxtaposed Yahoo Sports and ESP

N, implying the latter is at the opposite end of the sports journalism spectrum. In other words, ESPN is not journalism at all, it’s a media platform. Die Worldwide Leader! [/rant off]]

Given time, however, and left to simmer in just the right blend of bourbon and sweet tea, our nubbins brain cells will occasionally collide, initiating creative sparks that give rise to inspirations such as: 20 ways to smuggle booze into a stadium; how to force your kid to be a lefty; and can you project a ball game onto the truck in front of you and watch it while driving, and if so, is it legal.

Just such an orgy of creativity occurred after we heard of Texas A&M’s decision to join the SEC (an invitation from the SEC is immenent…who knows it might happen today). Our over-achieving neurons (think Travis McGriff) realized a fantastic vision of the future. No, not Tebow descending from a mile high and assuming the starting mantle for our beloved Jaguars (okay, my beloved Jaguars, we at bourbonmeyer don’t agree on everything), but rather, the secret behind conference realignment.

No doubt as you read this you’ll be reminded of the movie, “The Usual Suspects,” when Kevin Spacey’s limp disappears, truth smashing you in the face like Lawrence Wright over the middle.

You see, the powers that be – League Heads, Bowl Committees, etc. – recognize they can only stiff-arm a playoff for so long; the interest is too great and the March Madness model too compelling. Rather than allow a playoff system steal their power, however, they are secretly building a framework that creates a proxy playoff within the existing, albeit slightly modified, system that they control. When they’re done they’ll point to what they’ve built and say, “Behold, unwashed masses….I give you…a CFB playoff!”

The end state of these machinations is a system of four super-conferences, each consisting of 16 teams split into two 8-team divisions, with a league championship in December. This format whittles 64 teams (sound familiar) down to four league champions. The league championship games become Round 1 of the CFB playoff.

The four major bowls – Rose, Sugar, Orange, and Fiesta – are standing by to accommodate the four league champions, as well as an additional four teams – including the inevitable BCS-buster that pops up every year now. The bowls will rotate roles each year as they do now. This becomes Round 2 of the CFB playoff.

Here, a minor change must be introduced into the current system. The eight teams playing in the four major bowls must be chosen based on seeding rather than bowl committee preference. This is critical, since there is only one more round to determine the champion.

The final round, Round 3, would be a plus-one, a departure from the status quo. The winners of the two games from Round 2 that pit ‘1 vs. 4’ and ‘2 vs. 3’ would play in the plus-one to determine a true CFB champion for the first time.

I know what you’re saying, wait, we arrived at a final eight based on on-the-field results, then we subjectively pared them down to a top four, and then whittled the four down to a champion on the field. What gives?

I don’t know what to tell you. We’re missing the extra set of games needed to whittle eight down to a champion. I would contend that 99% of the time the best team in the country will come from the top four based on this format. In a perfect world, we’d have another round to get from eight to four, but I don’t see it.

Regardless, what a system like this does is whittle 64 of the major programs down to four champions. It is flexible enough to accommodate any teams not in the field of 64 – Boise and Notre Dame being the obvious schools left out (not that Notre Dame has to worry about being a title contender again). It then ranks, concededly subjectively, these teams to identify a top four. Those four then compete on the field to determine a champion.

We’ll go you one better here at bourbonmeyer. Our vision is so clear, we will even lay out what the conferences will look like when the dust settles.

Bourbon Meyer Changing The College Football Landscape

The teams in blue are new to the listed conferences. As you can see, the Big 12 provided much of the fodder; this fact is already in evidence. Beyond that, the ACC was pilfered, but sucked replacements from a now-irrelevant Big East. By the way, the Big 12 and Big East might continue to exist in some form, pulling whatever teams they can get, but they’ll be mostly irrelevant to the championship discussion.

You may disagree, but you will be wrong. Make your case in the comments below and we will summarily dispatch your nonsense argument with our profound wisdom.

And before you ask, no, Florida would never share a league with FSU. And we don’t care that you feel the same way South Carolina and Georgia, someone had to win.

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We at bourbonmeyer.com aren’t the smartest bunch. We’re in no danger of being confused for the crack sports journalists over at Yahoo Sports. Heck, we’re not even at ESPN’s level.
[You see what we did there, we juxtaposed Yahoo Sports and ESPN, implying the latter is at the opposite end of the sports journalism spectrum. In other words, ESPN is not journalism at all, it’s a media platform. Die Worldwide Leader! [/rant off]]
Given time, however, and left to simmer in just the right blend of bourbon and sweet tea, our nubbins brain cells will occasionally collide, initiating creative sparks that give rise to inspirations such as: 20 ways to smuggle booze into a stadium; how to force your kid to be a lefty; and can you project a ball game onto the truck in front of you and watch it while driving, and if so, is it legal.
Just such an orgy of creativity occurred after we heard of Texas A&M’s decision to join the SEC (an invitation from the SEC is immenent…who knows it might happen today). Our over-achieving neurons (think Travis McGriff) realized a fantastic vision of the future. No, not Tebow descending from a mile high and assuming the starting mantle for our beloved Jaguars (okay, my beloved Jaguars, we at bourbonmeyer don’t agree on everything), but rather, the secret behind conference realignment.
No doubt as you read this you’ll be reminded of the movie, “The Usual Suspects,” when Kevin Spacey’s limp disappears, truth smashing you in the face like Lawrence Wright over the middle.
You see, the powers that be – League Heads, Bowl Committees, etc. – recognize they can only stiff-arm a playoff for so long; the interest is too great and the March Madness model too compelling. Rather than allow a playoff system steal their power, however, they are secretly building a framework that creates a proxy playoff within the existing, albeit slightly modified, system that they control. When they’re done they’ll point to what they’ve built and say, “Behold, unwashed masses….I give you…a CFB playoff!”
The end state of these machinations is a system of four super-conferences, each consisting of 16 teams split into two 8-team divisions, with a league championship in December. This format whittles 64 teams (sound familiar) down to four league champions. The league championship games become Round 1 of the CFB playoff.
The four major bowls – Rose, Sugar, Orange, and Fiesta – are standing by to accommodate the four league champions, as well as an additional four teams – including the inevitable BCS-buster that pops up every year now. The bowls will rotate roles each year as they do now. This becomes Round 2 of the CFB playoff.
Here, a minor change must be introduced into the current system. The eight teams playing in the four major bowls must be chosen based on seeding rather than bowl committee preference. This is critical, since there is only one more round to determine the champion.
The final round, Round 3, would be a plus-one, a departure from the status quo. The winners of the two games from Round 2 that pit ‘1 vs. 4’ and ‘2 vs. 3’ would play in the plus-one to determine a true CFB champion for the first time.
I know what you’re saying, wait, we arrived at a final eight based on on-the-field results, then we subjectively pared them down to a top four, and then whittled the four down to a champion on the field. What gives?
I don’t know what to tell you. We’re missing the extra set of games needed to whittle eight down to a champion. I would contend that 99% of the time the best team in the country will come from the top four based on this format. In a perfect world, we’d have another round to get from eight to four, but I don’t see it.
Regardless, what a system like this does is whittle 64 of the major programs down to four champions. It is flexible enough to accommodate any teams not in the field of 64 – Boise and Notre Dame being the obvious schools left out (not that Notre Dame has to worry about being a title contender again). It then ranks, concededly subjectively, these teams to identify a top four. Those four then compete on the field to determine a champion.
We’ll go you one better here at bourbonmeyer. Our vision is so clear, we will even lay out what the conferences will look like when the dust settles.

Bourbon Meyer Changing The College Football LandscapeThe teams in blue are new to the listed conferences. As you can see, the Big 12 provided much of the fodder; this fact is already in evidence. Beyond that, the ACC was pilfered, but sucked replacements from a now-irrelevant Big East. By the way, the Big 12 and Big East might continue to exist in some form, pulling whatever teams they can get, but they’ll be mostly irrelevant to the championship discussion.
You may disagree, but you will be wrong. Make your case in the comments below and we will summarily dispatch your nonsense argument with our profound wisdom.
And before you ask, no, Florida would never share a league with FSU. And we don’t care that you feel the same way South Carolina and Georgia, someone had to win.

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4 Responses to Conference Realignment, Super Conferences and a Playoff

  1. Wow, this does sound like it could work. But that dang Boise State cinderella team! Notre Dame should’ve officially joined the Big Ten/East a long time ago, so if they get left out, so be it! I really would hate to see FSU join the SEC. Talk about hatred heaped on top of hatred….

  2. Mike says:

    It’s obvious that the SEC and Big 12 would rule this aet up. The ACC would be the weakest link once again. Where is Vandy?

  3. jdubyou3 says:

    Wisdom – Agreed. I’d really like to see Boise in a conference, end that narrative for a while.

    Mike – The SEC will rule any set-up, that’s a fact. Vandy was dropped after the words ‘Super Conference’ were typed. I love Vandy, but if we’re getting serious about football, they have to go. No need to maintain the SEC league GPA farce any longer.

  4. Pingback: Bourbon Meyer | SEC Expansion and This Week’s Top 21

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